Razib Khan One-stop-shopping for all of my content

October 30, 2013

The human genetic casserole

Filed under: Archaeology,Human History — Razib Khan @ 6:48 pm

HotdishI haven’t said much about this article in Science, Ancient DNA Links Native Americans With Europe, because it would be an understatement to say I’m digesting it. I would offer up a caution that using terms like “Europeans” and “East Asians” for populations which flourished ~25,000 years ago might be misleading. We are used to thinking of genetic distance in terms of space, but time is also a dimension to consider. Populations even without admixture or gene flow will have drifted in allele frequencies over so many generations.

But I have to admit that it seems more and more likely that most extant modern populations are combinations of lineages which diverged very early after the “Out of Africa” migration. We see this clearly with South Asians, and now Europeans and Native Americans. The Reich lab has also found evidence of admixture in in Australians. The closer we look, the more amalgamation we see between disparate lineages. Using the elements of the present to reconstruct the patterns of the past is going to be a more daunting task than most would have guessed.

The post The human genetic casserole appeared first on Gene Expression.

June 24, 2012

SMBE 2012

Dienekes has summaries up of human-related abstracts of Society for Molecular Biology & Evolution 2012.

1) Remember these are not papers, and some of the abstracts may never become papers, at least in recognizable form

2) Speaking of which, Estimating a date of mixture of ancestral South Asian populations:


Linguistic and genetic studies have demonstrated that almost all groups in South Asia today descend from a mixture of two highly divergent populations: Ancestral North Indians (ANI) related to Central Asians, Middle Easterners and Europeans, and Ancestral South Indians (ASI) not related to any populations outside the Indian subcontinent. ANI and ASI have been estimated to have diverged from a common ancestor as much as 60,000 years ago, but the date of the ANI-ASI mixture is unknown. Here we analyze data from about 60 South Asian groups to estimate that major ANI-ASI mixture occurred 1,200-4,000 years ago. Some mixture may also be older—beyond the time we can query using admixture linkage disequilibrium—since it is universal throughout the subcontinent: present in every group speaking Indo-European or Dravidian languages, in all caste levels, and in primitive tribes. After the ANI-ASI mixture that occurred ...

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